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IEI's Creativity Machine Based Dream Art
Imagination Engines, Inc., Home of the Creativity Machine
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Creativity Machine Based Dream Art

 

Summary - For at least 40 years, our founder has stimulated neural nets to autonomously dream new visual art forms, beginning in the 70s with creative variations of smiley faces frozen into the simple neural nets of that period. In the late 80s and early 90s Creativity Machines produced bizarre faces like the one shown directly below. There the neural system is 'looking' at what the tabloids speculated was a face-like pyramid on Mars and generating what is ostensibly an infamous fascist prepared for extraterrestrial asylum. It turns out that many of these images sparked lively conversation at conferences in the late 1990s and early 2000s, but there never seemed to be much interest in capitalizing upon the process. Quite frankly, the techies weren't impressed by the art, and the artistic types just shunned it all as non-human and hence not artistic at all!

ancient CM dream

IEI Dream Art - Shown below are numerous examples of more recent 24-bit color dreams (originally 640 x 480 resolution) produced by Creativity Machines (2013-2015). What you might be seeing in the press as "dream imagery," is the result of an immense development budget and proportionate marketing, but it really isn't that new conceptually. We've been doing it for decades! The big difference is that:

  1. Our Creativity Machine based neural system accumulates lots of visual experience by looking at a wide variety of scenes, not just dog heads and pagodas.

  2. Internal noise is introduced to a "blindfolded" Creativity Machine so as to generate all pixels in parallel. Internal to the neural system, lines, forms, and colors compete for dominance so as to form an entirely new image from what it's seen before.

  3. A critic system, oftentimes consisting of other neural nets chooses forming images it particularly 'likes', while selectively dissolving those it doesn't.

  4. The Creativity Machine consists of millions of layers, not 30 or 138, but millions.

  5. Our work was done at the hobby level, on shoestring budgets.

IEI Dream Art 1

IEI Dream Art 2

IEI Dream Art 3

In contrast, what is surfacing on the Internet is the result of a neural system looking at a scene and making piecemeal replacements, one small area at a time. By virtue of feeding their system weird or non-contextual images, the resulting imagery is likewise weird, but not so amazing because the system has been purposely engineered to yield bizarre results. What you see above is the output of a synthetic brain that has been exposed to what may be considered normal and then, of its own accord, generating highly unusual yet coherent imagery.

Furthermore, this is true dream art as it emulates the process wherein the reptilian brain generates spurious noise that the sleeping cortex then interprets as a mixture of memories, both true and false.

So, just an FYI. As you see various accomplishments by artificial neural systems, keep in mind that all ideas take the form of noise-stimulated neuronal activation patterns within the brain, and that other such nets judge novelty, utility, and value thereof. That is the extremely fundamental Creativity Machine, that has already produced unusual imagery, prose, pottery, music, natural language, etc., etc.

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